Home / آموزش زبانهای خارجی - Learning Second Language / Spanish - Español / آموزش زبانهای خارجی : الفبای زبان اسپانیایی – Learning Second Language The Spanish Alphabet , Alfabeto Español

آموزش زبانهای خارجی : الفبای زبان اسپانیایی – Learning Second Language The Spanish Alphabet , Alfabeto Español

Spanish-speaking-countries-map-composition3 SPANISH_map spanish_lang_map

آموزش زبانهای خارجی : الفبای زبان اسپانیایی

The Spanish language is quite easy to pronounce since most letters (or phonemes) only have one sound  

همراه با صدای ضبط شده تلقظ صحیح الفبای زبان اسپانیایی توسط دو نفر از کشورهای اسپانیا و مکزیک برای آشنایی به طرزتلفظ این الفبا در هر دو کشور اسپانیا و مکزیک در لینک دانلود انتهای همین صفحه

Spanish (español/castellano)

Spanish is a Romance language with approximately 470 million speakers, 410 of whom speak it as a first language while the remainder speak it as a second language. A significant number of people also speak Spanish as a foreign language. Spanish is spoken in Spain and 22 other countries including: Andorra, Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, the USA and Venezuela
Spanish first started to appear in writing in the form of notes and glosses in Latin religious texts, the Glosas Emilianenses, dating from the 11th century. During the 12th century, law codes (Fueros) were being translated into Spanish. Spanish prose flowered during the reign of King Alfonso X the Wise of Castile (1252-84), who in addition to being the king and a poet, also found time to write an encyclopaedia in Spanish called Las Partidas, which contains laws, chronicles, recipes, and rules for hunting, chess and card games. The first Spanish grammar, by Antonio de Nebrija, and the first dictionaries were published during the 15th and 16th centuries.

In Spain this language is generally called español (Spanish) when contrasting it with languages of other countries, such as French and English, but it is called castellano (Castilian, the language of the Castile region) when contrasting it with other languages spoken in Spain, such as Galician, Basque, and Catalan.

Some philologists use Castilian only when speaking of the language spoken in Castile during the Middle Ages, stating that it is preferable to use Spanish for its modern form. The subdialect of Spanish spoken in northern parts of modern day Castile is also called Castilian sometimes, and differs from those of other regions of Spain, however the Castilian dialect is conventionally considered in Spain to be the same as standard Spanish.

The name castellano is widely used for the language in Latin America. Some Spanish speakers consider castellano a generic term with no political or ideological links, much as “Spanish” in English.

Spanish Alphabet and Pronunciation

SpanishAlphabet

The Spanish language is quite easy to pronounce since most letters (or phonemes) only have one sound. The list below will serve as a guide for how to pronounce each letter alone and in combination with other letters.

a    ah
Close to “ah.” This sound does not exist exactly in English, but a close approximation can be found by saying “my” omitting the last “ee” sound.

b    beh
After a pause or the letters l, m, or n, it sounds much like an English b. However, in all other cases, the lips do not even touch, producing a more whisper like sound almost close to the pronunciation of the letter v.

c    ceh
Sounds like k in most cases. Before e or i, it sounds like an s (or th (thick) in many parts of Spain).

ch    cheh
Sounds like the ch in “cheese” in English.

d    deh
After a pause or the letters l, m, or n, it sounds much like an English d except you should place your tongue to your upper teeth instead of the roof of your mouth. However, in all other cases, the tongue touches nothing, creating a whispery th sound like “the”.

e    eh
Close to “eh.” This sound does not exist exactly in English, but sounds much like the a in mate.

f    effe
Sounds like the f in English.

g    ge
After a pause, or the letters l, m, or n, it sounds much like an English g. Before e or i, it sounds like a harsh h (much like the Spanish j).

h    hache
In general, this sound is silent. However, words with foreign spelling and no Spanish equivalent, the breathy aspiration is maintained: Hawái, Hollywood, etc.

* Many newly introduced words are written in italics to highlight their foreign origin (hámster, hip-hop, etc.).

i    i
Close to “ee”, but short. Before vowels a, e, and o, it forms a y sound.

j    jota
Close to the English h sound, but it varies from country to country. In some places, the sound is very harsh in the back of the throat (like you are trying to spit something up). It never sounds like the English J.

k    kah
Uncommon in Spanish, but sounds much like the English k with less breath.

l    ele
Close to the English l, but with the tongue raised closer to the roof of the mouth rather than dipped down

ll    elle
While this is not considered a letter anymore by the RAE, it has a distinct y sound (like in use) in most countries. In other countries it can sound like the g in genre.

m    eme
Just like the English m.

n    ene
Just like the English n.

ñ    eñe
A completely separate letter from the n, it sounds much like the ni combination in onion or the ny combination in canyon.

o    oh
Close to “oh” as in so, but shorter.

p    peh
Close to the English, but with less breath aspirated

q    koo
Always followed by the letter u, it makes the same sound as the letter k

r    ere
Similar to the d sound in caddy in most cases. When following a pause or the letters l, n, or s or in the combination rr, it has a trilled sound.

* To trill the rr, try to say brr, but instead of using your lips, use your tongue. When you exhale, the tongue should be raised and widened so it touches the upper teeth.

s    ese
Just like the English s.

t    te
Softer than the English t, the tongue touches the teeth and there is no explosion of breath after moving the tongue away.

u    u
Close to the “oo” in food, but shorter.

v    veh
Much like the Spanish b where the lips do not touch and there is less aspiration.

w    doble veh
Not native to Spanish, but with the same pronunciation as the English w.

x    equis
Between vowels and at the end of a word, it sounds like the English ks. At the beginning of a word, it sounds like the letter s.

* Not too long ago, the x sounded more like the letter j which can still be seen in words such as Mexico and Oaxaca.

y    y griega
Most of the time, it sounds like the English y in yes. At the end of a word, it functions as a vowel and sounds like the letter i.

* Many books in Spain will say the sound is different from the ll, but the difference is small and you will be understood pronouncing both as y

z    zeta
Mostly pronounced like the English s, but can sound like the th in thin in many parts of Spain.

The Spanish alphabet Pronunciations , Recordings

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About Mohammad Daeizadeh

  • تمامی فایل ها قبل از قرار گیری در سایت تست شده اند.لطفا در صورت بروز هرگونه مشکل از طریق نظرات مارا مطلع سازید.
  • پسورد تمامی فایل های موجود در سایت www.parsseh.com می باشد.(تمامی حروف را می بایست کوچک وارد کنید)
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